C  H  R  I  S  T  I  A  N  I  T  Y 
through the lens of 
CHRISTIAN & MUSLIM SCHOLARS
Part Two

Mohd Amin Yaacob

al-Firdaus.Com

CONTENTS

Preface    

CHAPTER SEVEN

CHAPTER EIGHT

CHAPTER NINE   

CHAPTER TEN  

CHAPTER ELEVEN

Contradictions And Errors In The Biblical Text    

11.1   Prophet Solomon Died As An Apostate

11.2   Concerning The Number Of Men Of Israel Who Returned From Exile

11.3   The Prophecy Concerning The Coming And Death Of Jesus

11.4   The Genealogy Of Jesus

11.5   The Prophecy In Hosea “I Called My Son Out Of Egypt”

11.6   Contradiction Between The Saying Of Jesus And John The Baptist

11.7   The Earthquake and the Raising of the Dead at Jesus Crucifixion

11.8   The Second Coming Of Jesus.

11.9   The Prophecy Of Prophet Jeremiah Concerning The Betrayer Of Jesus 

EPILOGUE 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

 

 

 

 

  

11.3  The Prophecy Concerning The Coming And Death Of Jesus

 

Christian preachers in their effort of evangelism throughout the world, proclaim that the coming and death of Jesus Christ was already prophesized in chapter 53 verse 1-12 of the Old Testament Book of Isaiah, which is as follows:

 

Who has believed our message? To whom will the Lord reveal his saving power? My servant grew up in the Lord’s presence like a tender green shoot, sprouting from a root in dry and sterile ground. There was nothing beautiful or majestic about his appearance, nothing to attract us to him. He was despised and rejected –a man of sorrows, acquainted with bitterest grief. We turned our backs on him and looked the other way when he went by. He was despised, and we did not care. Yet it was our weaknesses he carried; it was our sorrows that weighed him down. And we thought his troubles were a punishment from God for his own sins! But he was wounded and crushed for our sins. He was beaten that we might have peace. He was whipped, and we were healed! All of us have stayed away like sheep. We have left God’s path to follow our own. Yet the Lord laid on him the guilt and sins of us all. He was oppressed and treated harshly, yet he never said a word. He was lead as a lamb to the slaughter. And as a sheep is silent before the shearers, he did not open his mouth. From prison and trial they lead him to his death…”(NLT)

 

Did Isaiah predict Jesus silence at his trial? “And as a sheep is silent before the shearers, he did not open his mouth”

 

Let’s see what the Gospel of Mark and John had to say about this.

                            

Jesus trial before Pilate

 

Chapter 15 verse one to five of Mark’s has:

 

“Very early in the morning the leading priests, other leaders, and teachers of religious Law—the entire high council—met to discuss their next step. They bound Jesus and took him to Pilate, the Roman Governor. Pilate asked Jesus, “Are you the King of the Jews?! Jesus replied, “Yes, it is as you say.” (NLT)

 

Chapter 18 verse thirty-three to thirty four of John says:

 

“Then Pilate went back inside and called for Jesus to be brought to him. Are you the king of the Jews? He asked him. Jesus replied, “is this your question or did others tell you about me.” (NLT)

 

Who is more appropriate in understanding the Prophecy of Isaiah better than the Jewish Rabbis themselves? After all, the Book of Isaiah is part of their Holy Scriptures long before the Christians accepted it. In their rebuttal against the Christians understanding of the Old Testament prophecies of Isaiah, the Jewish Rabbis stated that:

 

“According to the Gospels, both the Jewish officials and Pilate, when questioning Jesus directed their inquiry to his messianic pretensions. Far from showing the humility and silence with which Isaiah describes the servant in verse 7, the encounter between the high priest, the elders, and Jesus is highlighted by a vigorous verbal exchange. In addition, Jesus did not show humility and silence during his confrontation with Pilate. At their meeting, Jesus is depicted as skillfully defending himself. Jesus at no time humbled himself, but on the contrary, presented a clever verbal defense before Pilate (the one man who could condemn him to death), pleading shrewdly that his messianic teaching was nonviolent, ‘not of this world’ movement, one which the Romans need not fear...Thus, contrary to what many Christian Missionary theologians would have us believe, Jesus presented a strong defense before the Jewish officials and Pilate. Jesus was not ‘dumb’ before his accusers, Jewish or Gentile, and it is simply not true to say of Jesus that “he humbled himself and did not open his mouth…It is obvious that Isaiah 53:7 makes no reference to Jesus.” [1]

 


 
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[1]           Sigal, Gerald, Jews For Judaism (2000) [online], Available:

http://www.jewsforjudaism.org/j4j-2000/index.html