C  H  R  I  S  T  I  A  N  I  T  Y 
through the lens of 
CHRISTIAN & MUSLIM SCHOLARS
Part Two

Mohd Amin Yaacob

al-Firdaus.Com

CONTENTS

Preface

CHAPTER SEVEN

CHAPTER EIGHT

CHAPTER NINE   

CHAPTER TEN  

The Authenticity Of The Bible

10.1   The Word “Bible” Is Not Given By God

10.2   The Books Of The Bible

10.3   The Original Gospel Or Injil Of Jesus No Longer Exist

10.4   Different Version Of The “One Bible Claim”

10.5       Martin Luther Rejected Part Of The Present Books Of The New Testament

10.6   Prophet Moses Didn’t Wrote The Christian “Torah” Or “Taurat"

10.7   The Canon Of The Christian Bible Was Completed Four Hundred Years After Jesus

10.8   The New Testament Books Were Not Written By The Apostles Whose Name They Bear

10.9   The Church Fathers Rejected Some Of The Present New Testament Books

10.10 The Inspiration Of The Holy Spirit

CHAPTER ELEVEN

EPILOGUE 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

 

 

 

 

10.6  Prophet Moses didn’t write the Christian “Torah” or “Taurat”

 

The Torah or Taurat of the Christians comprises the Pentateuch (from Greek, meaning “five scrolls”). They are The Old Testament Book of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. [1] Christian and Jewish traditions believed that these five books were written by Prophet Moses, peace be upon him. Surprisingly Richard Elliot Friedman, a biblical scholar, Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature and holds the Katzin Chair at the University of California, a visiting scholar at Oxford and Cambridge, has made a shocking statement concerning who wrote the Torah. In his “Who Wrote The Bible?” He states that:

 

“Early Jewish and Christian tradition held that Moses himself wrote them, though nowhere in the Five Books of Moses themselves does the text say that he was the author. But the tradition that one person, Moses, alone wrote these books presented problems. People observed contradictions in the text. It would report events in a particular order, and later it would say that those same events happened in a different order. It would say that there were two of something, and elsewhere it would say that there were fourteen of that same thing. It would say that the Moabites did something, and later it would say that it was the Midianites who did it…People also noticed that the Five Books of Moses included things that Moses could not have known or was not likely to have said. The text, after all, gave an account of Moses death. It also said that Moses was the humblest man on earth; and normally one would not expect the humblest man on earth to point out that he is the humblest man on earth.” [2]


 
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[1]           Friedman, Richard Elliot, Who Wrote The Bible (Harper Collins Publishers, USA) , 17

[2]           pg 17-18 (emphasis added)