CONTENTS

PREFACE

ISLAM IS THE ONLY ONE

CHAPTER 1

CHAPTER 2

CHAPTER 3

THE DOCTRINE OF THE TRINITY AND
INCARNATION

3.1     The Trinity

3.2     The Origin of the Trinity

3.3     God: One in Three Persons

3.4     Three Persons but Same Essence or Nature (al-Dzat)

3.5     Relationship Between God The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit

3.6     The Essence  (al-Dzat) of God the Father is in the Son and the Holy Spirit

3.7     God Is Not Splitting Into Three Parts

3.8     The Three Divine Persons Do Not Exist Side By Side In The Divine World

3.9     In the Trinity No One is Greater, Less, Separate Nor Subordinate One to the Other

3.10   Jesus Could Not Be Separated From the Father and the Holy Spirit

3.11   Jesus as God the Creator

3.12   Jesus: God That Became Man (al-Hulul wa al-Ittihad)

3.13   The Chalcedon Creed: The Unity of the Two Natures of Jesus Christ without Change,
Division or Separation

 3.14   As A Perfect Sin Offering For Mankind: God Became Man

3.15   The Trinity: Christians Were Themselves Confused

CHAPTER 4

CHAPTER 5

CHAPTER 6

EPILOGUE

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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            The Creed of Judaism, known as the Shema runs as follows: 

“Shema Yisroel! Adonoi elaheynu adonoi achud!” (Hear O Israel! The Lord our God, The Lord is One!)  

The remainder of the Shema in detail reads: 

“And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your strength. And you must commit yourselves wholeheartedly to these commands I am giving you today. Repeat them again and again to your children. Talk about them when you are at home and when you are away on a journey, when you are lying down and when you are getting up again. Tie them to your hands as a reminder, and wear them on your forehead. Write them on the door posts of your house and your gates.” (Deuteronomy 6:4-9, NLT)[1]

 Since Christianity established its belief in God on the Jewish inheritance it might be argued that it is, in fact, a Unitarian Faith. The Christian conception of God, however, differs dramatically from the God of Judaism. St. Gregory of Nazianzus (329-389 C.E), one of the “Church Fathers” is at pains to distinguish the Christian God not only from polytheism but also from the Jewish predecessor:

“We do not postulate three origins, to avoid Greek Polytheism. Nor do we believe in a God who is one in the narrow, jealous, impotent sense, like the Jewish God.”[2]


 

[1]           Islam Versus Ahl Al Kitab: Past and Present, 24

[2]           Bettenson, Henry, The Later Christian Fathers (Oxford University Press), 1970, 116, in Muhammad Abu Layla, The Muslim View Of Christianity With Special reference To The Work Of Ibn Hazm (PhD Thesis), Exeter University, 1983, 391